Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food. ~Hippocrates


Nutrition science seems fickle when experts keep revising their recommendations based on new research. Compounding consumer confusion is the vast misinformation swirling around the Internet. So what, do you wonder, should you do?

First, let’s clarify the difference between serum (blood) cholesterol and dietary cholesterol. Serum cholesterol is most affected by the consumption of saturated fat, primarily from animal sources (meats and high fat dairy). An egg contains only 2 grams of saturated fat, as compared to 15 grams in a 6 oz. piece of tenderloin beef. Saturated fat produces cholesterol in your body.

Eggs pack a lot of nutrition in an inexpensive package. The protein quality is excellent. A large egg has only 72 calories, and 185 milligrams of cholesterol. It has essential nutrients like choline and lutein, which are good for the brain and eyes respectively. Eggs are a good source of vitamins B12 and D, important for the nervous system, bone health, and more. Best of all, eggs are among the most economical, versatile and easy-to-prepare foods.

The current guidelines allow one egg per day, most days of the week (I recommend up to 5 days per week). On other days, have oatmeal or other whole grain cold cereals with fat free milk, fruit and whole grain breads for breakfast. Skip breakfast meats, butter and cheese, which are high in saturated fats. Count the milligrams in your daily intake of cholesterol from all sources. Limit it to 300 milligrams per day; 200 if already diagnosed with heart disease.

Make the most eggs’ nutritious properties by adding vegetables to your dishes. Served with whole grain bread, a vegetable omelet is very satisfying and will keep you full for many hours.

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Comments on: "Cholesterol Confusion" (2)

  1. Great information + article. Cholesterol isn’t always the bad guy it’s cracked up to be. Plus – the dietary cholesterol you actually consume isn’t that dangerous..like you mentioned your body only clings on to the dietary cholesterol it needs – if it’s not need it just gets flushed from the body. It’s the fat that turn to cholesterol from bad fats in the diet that are the dangers!

  2. Thank you for your comments. It’s hard to identify the good advice from the crazy, fad-riddled information, isn’t it? Plus, changes in discoveries due to research just make it worse! Well, let’s keep trying to provide the best that science has to offer at the given moment in time!

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