Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food. ~Hippocrates

Archive for the ‘antioxidants’ Category

Roasted Tomatoes


Roasted Tomatoes

Technically a fruit, we use tomatoes more like a vegetable. Tomatoes are SO healthy! They have no fat or cholesterol, very few calories, sugar and sodium, yet pack a lot of flavor and nutrients. They have a good dose of Vitamins A, C, K, folate and choline, and minerals calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and potassium. Their high antioxidant content makes them good cancer fighters as well, sweeping up all those free radicals we accumulate from other “bad” foods, particularly those with nitrates and nitrites, grilled foods, etc.

Roasting tomatoes brings out the intense tomato flavor that is delicious with the right herbs and spices. I find the best complement to tomatoes are spices used frequently in Italian cooking: parsley, oregano and basil. Because they will bake and absorb the seasonings, you can happily use dried herbs, but feel free to use fresh if you want to.

I use many kinds of tomatoes, but the juicier varieties are the best. Roma tomatoes are nice, but tricky to stand in the baking dish due to their shape. Slice lengthwise if using this variety. Here is the simple recipe. Enjoy.

Discard the stem. Slice tomatoes in half and line up on a lightly oiled baking dish. Sprinkle the tomatoes with dried oregano, basil and parsley (equal amounts of each) and a dusting of salt if you like, though it is not necessary if you are minding your sodium intake.

You can also sprinkle with grated parmesan or romano cheese (then don’t use the salt) and bake at 350 degrees. The length of time depends on the size of your tomatoes. For cherry tomatoes, 20 minutes will do. For medium to larger ones you will need at least 30 minutes, and up to 45 minutes. Remove and serve!

Also good at room temperature, so you can make it a little ahead if you need the oven for other dishes.

Advertisements

Ginger Carrot Soup Made Healthy & Easy


I am always looking for ways to make great recipes easy and more healthful. Starting with a class assignment, I took a fat-laden soup and made it healthy, as well as vegetarian/vegan friendly with some alternative suggestions. Here is the result of changing an Emeril recipe, made with heavy whipping cream and sour cream, to a heart-healthy winter dish, saving 426 calories (496 calories if milk is omitted). There are 45 fewer grams of fat and most of it is shifted to mono or unsaturated fat – the good kind). Serve with good bread and a salad and you have dinner! Yield = 4 servings.

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup diced onions
  • 1/2 cup diced celery
  • 1/4 cup minced fresh ginger
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh garlic
  • 1 pound carrots, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 4 to 6 cups vegetable stock
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1/2 cup 2% milk (* may be omitted for vegan)
  • Chopped chives, for garnish

Using a 4-quart stock pot over medium-high heat, heat the olive oil. Place the onions and celery in until they are translucent, about 3 to 4 minutes. Add the ginger and garlic and cook for 30 seconds. Add the carrots to the pot and cook, stirring occasionally, until the carrots are lightly caramelized and start to soften, about 7 to 8 minutes. Add the stock, salt, pepper and bay leaf, bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. Cook the soup until the carrots are tender, about 20 to 25 minutes.

Remove the bay leaf from the soup and puree the soup in the pot with an immersion blender or in batches in a heat proof blender. Adjust the seasoning, add the milk at the end if desired (omit for vegan).

Garnish with a sprinkling of fresh chives or parsley.

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: