Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food. ~Hippocrates

Posts tagged ‘Food’

Foods of Different Cultures and Weight


I have a great excuse for the long hiatus. I was traveling. For nearly three weeks, I ate in England, South Africa and Israel. Very different cuisines, I can assure you. To be honest, I won’t even count England because I ate Italian food in London while in transit to the other two  countries. I had already made up my mind that I didn’t care to eat traditional English food such as kidney pies and blood pudding. Too much carnivorous fare for my taste, and not necessarily the body parts I would choose.

In South Africa, at a resort in a game preserve, I found the food not to be too unfamiliar. There were just a few new flavors, but nothing exotic. I was surprised to find chicken livers with onions (secretly, a favorite), but I first had this food at my Jewish grandmother’s house. The most exotic I would say, was the venison stew. Nicely flavored and tender. I waited until after tasting it to ask what kind of meat it was, lest the answer influence my perception. “Oh, it’s wildebeest,” I was told. All I could think of was those stampeding animals who killed Mufasa in the Lion King. It was actually quite good. They served a lot of meat, in spite of the fact that vegetables and fruit grow in abundance in those parts. I guess it is their perception that Americans want their meat – and they accommodate.

Israeli food is really not a specific cuisine; rather a mix of the many cultures that inhabit the land and those of the people who came to live in Israel from around the world. You will find Moroccan, Mediterranean, Turkish, Eastern European, Spanish and Indian influence. For sure, fruits and vegetables are dominant in most meals. Produce is abundant and cheaper than in the US.

As a nutritionist, I am always looking at the composition of healthy to unhealthy weight in the population, and the foods that are commonly eaten, the lifestyle, etc. I was struck that obesity was prevalent in the bush of South Africa until I visited the supermarket and saw an entire aisle with chips and other junk foods. Also, prepared foods were fatty, greasy meats and white floured grains and bread. There was plenty of soda, and kids were seen carrying bottles of Coke and sipping other very sweet drinks.

In contrast, there was much less obesity in Israel, in spite of large portions of foods at mealtimes. Because the meals consist of so much more vegetable than meat, caloric intake is lower. In the cities, many people walk and use bicycles; another healthy lifestyle habit contributing to healthier weights.

We should take a lesson. I will be. This weekend I am entertaining friends. The menu will be vegetarian. Tonight I had a vegetarian meal. I am committed to making at least 2 nights per week “meat-free” in my home. Prepared with a variety of spices and herbs, vegetables are actually delicious! Check out my recipes. I will be adding more vegetable inspired dishes.

Advertisements

The New Year and Resolutions: Change the Paradigm


The most common greeting this time of year is “Have a happy and healthy new year.” Is this just a knee jerk reaction to the overindulgence of the holidays or a well intentioned attempt to just pay attention to our health since we are a year older and a year closer to death?

However well-intentioned our resolutions are, they are often short-lived. Life is busy, stuff happens, you lose motivation when you lose only 2 pounds a week, etc. This doesn’t mean that there is no way to achieve a healthy weight. It just means you are either going about it the wrong way or that you have unrealistic expectations. Here are some tips to help you achieve your health goals in 2013.

1. REPEAT AFTER ME: There is no magic diet that will sustain weight loss

Even bariatric surgery doesn’t work if you don’t comply with a rigid protocol. While there are many who do well on this program, it is by their choice – not because they had a “magic” operation. Diets are temporary. Lifestyle is permanent. Change your lifestyle – change  your health.

2. Health is more than eating right. While diet is an important part of good health, so is exercise, not smoking, and getting enough sleep. Studies show that sleep deprivation messes with your hunger and satiety hormones, making you crave bad foods and disconnecting the “I’m full now, stop eating” button. Exercise improves all bodily functions regulating appetite, metabolism and sending oxygen to all you cells. It also reduces stress – another trigger for poor eating (think “comfort food”). Muscles built by exercising utilize more calories than fat. Yes, if you sit on the couch after a workout, your body will burn more calories than if you stand around while unfit.

3. Breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Your mother was right. Your body has been at rest for 8 or more hours since last being fueled. Your metabolism has slowed down. A healthy breakfast jumpstarts your metabolism for the whole day! That’s right! Skip breakfast and your body never revs up, keeping metabolism slow all day, to protect energy (and fat). A healthy breakfast includes a protein, a carb and some fat. Protein and fat keeps you satisfied longer so you aren’t hungry for lunch prematurely. Carbs are needed for brain and muscle  function. (Did you know that your brain lives on glucose, broken down from carbs?) Just make your carbs healthy ones – whole grains like whole wheat bread, brown rice, oatmeal, cream of wheat, bran flakes, etc. Look at the labels to be sure the grains are whole. “Multigrain” does not mean whole. The ingredients must say “whole” to derive all the nutritious benefits of a whole grain: protein, fiber and the slow release of carbs, keeping your blood glucose from spiking.

4. Drink, drink, drink. Dehydration is more common as we age because our thirst mechanism starts to fail. Don’t rely on thirst to be sure you get enough fluid. Even a small amount of dehydration affects your ability to perform well at any task, may lower your blood pressure to unhealthy levels and make you constipated. Also important is that the need for fluids often masquerades as hunger. You reach for food when in fact you need fluid. The amount of fluid needed varies from person to person but a good rule of thumb is 8 glasses per day. All liquids count (even coffee and tea) and many foods contain fluid. Fruit contains a lot of fluid (think oranges, watermelon, etc.). BUT BEWARE. Not all drinks are created equal. Those flavored mocha latte whatevers have a high calorie and fat count. Be smart about how you get your calories. Reserve them for foods that also carry nutrients with them – not empty calories like junk foods.

5. Eat slowly. People who eat slowly consume fewer calories because they give the body a chance to register fullness. Scarfing down your food before the signal comes means you are already too stuffed.

6. When you eat out, order a takeout container when you order your meal. Putting aside half the meal before you even dig in will cause you to stop before the plate is empty.

7. Use smaller plates. Psychologically, a full plate is more appealing. Loading a large plate with a reasonable portion may make you feel less satisfied. Go ahead, fill that bread and butter plate with healthy food and you can clean it without guilt.

8. Eat more meals. Eat three modest meals each day, with a small, nutritious snack between breakfast and lunch, and lunch and dinner. You will be less likely to overeat at any meal because you won’t be as hungry. Skipping a meal has the double negative impact of making you ravenous and slowing your metabolism. Don’t skip meals to manage weight. Studies have shown time and time again, that those who eat small, frequent meals and eat breakfast, weigh less than their peers who starve and binge.

9. Read labels and record what you eat. I can’t emphasize this enough. Awareness of what you are putting into your mouth is the secret of those who lose weight successfully. We think twice before downing a handful of nuts when we know how many calories and grams of fat are in them. If we choose to eat them, and record them, we have a better handle on what we can consume the rest of the day.

10. Follow the 80/20 rule. If you are careful about what you eat 80% of the time, you can safely indulge the other 20% of the time.

Have a happy and healthy new year!

 

Lemon-Marinated Shrimp


 

  • Serves 12. Nutrition info per serving: 73 calories; 3 g fat ( 0 g sat , 2 g mono ); 92 mg cholesterol; 1 g carbohydrates; 0 g added sugars; 10 g protein; 0 g fiber; 154 mg sodium; 108 mg potassium
  • Ingredients:
  • 3 tablespoons minced garlic
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup minced fresh parsley
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 1/4 pounds cooked shrimp
  • Brown garlic in oil in a small frypan on medium heat for 1 min. Add lemon juice, parsley, salt and pepper. Toss with shrimp in large bowl. Refrigerate. Give it at least 2 hours to marinate before serving

 

Strategies for Managing Holiday Eating


Pardon my hiatus. No, I haven’t been absent because I went off the healthy eating wagon and started eating junk food (though the impending holiday season is beginning to present many challenges to my commitment to remain sugar-sober).

With this in mind, I began seeking treats that would not compromise my commitment, while allowing me to partake in the eating festivities. Lucky you! My search will deliver some healthy alternatives to the sugar and fat-laden holiday treats. Caution: they will still be on the cusp of healthy, so don’t get too giddy. It will make traditionally VERY unhealthy options into HEALTHIER options. Stay tuned for recipes in upcoming posts.

While you wait, I will offer some pearls of wisdom about eating during the holiday season without feeling deprived. First let me preface this by saying it is OK to indulge a little. Serial overindulgence – not such a good idea.

Focus on the purpose of holiday gatherings. Surely it is about being with family and friends first, and yes, that goes with eating. But, food need not be the focus alone. Plan other activities: walks, movies (hold the high calorie candy), trips to the city, shopping together, etc.

The most common temptation and least healthy choice is the appetizer. Those pretty, flaky little things passed on trays during cocktail hour are laden with fat and calories – more pound for pound than nearly any other food. So how do you dodge this bullet? Try to eat something healthy or have a hot cup of broth or tea before you go to the party. It will curb your appetite. When there, look for shrimp cocktail. The sauce typically is tomato based with spice and nearly fat free. Shrimp has no fat, though it is high in cholesterol, so eat modestly. Vegetable crudities and fruit are often available on a table. Fill up on these so you are less tempted to eat less healthful options.

Avoid anything wrapped in bacon or flaky pastry dough (ie.-cocktail franks), food that is  deep fried or swimming in cream sauce. If you are trying to monitor desserts, look for fruit, sorbet, or just limit yourself to one small pastry or one cookie.

It is possible to survive the onslaught of holiday festivities if you prepare yourself mentally and look for healthier options. If you are going with a partner, ask him or her to help remind you with a gentle signal (or a hammer to the hand if they need more severe assistance).

Happy holidays!

Follow up on Healthy Dining Out


Because it is hard to know what is in each menu dish (and the waiter/waitress often doesn’t know either), here is a quick and dirty way to know which foods to select and which to avoid, to reduce the fat in your meal.

AVOID:

  • Battered, breaded
  • Pot pies
  • Crispy
  • Tempura
  • Parmesan
  • Alfredo
  • Cheese sauce
  • Buttered, buttery
  • Hollandaise
  • Au gratin
  • Casserole
  • Prime meats
  • Hash (browns, corned beef, etc.)
  • Braised
  • Fried, deep-fried
  • Creamed

Instead, look for these words, which indicate the meal is prepared with less fat:

  • Poached
  • Broiled
  • Sautéed (without breading)
  • Flame broiled, grilled
  • Steamed
  • In own juices
  • Loin and flank meat cuts
  • Roasted
  • Baked
  • Teriaki (high in sodium)
  • Marinara or tomato sauce
  • Picante, pico de gallo, salsa

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: