Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food. ~Hippocrates

Archive for March, 2018

Revisiting the Supplement Conversation


I have written about supplements in the past. As research continues on their efficacy, it is being shown for the most part, that they are a waste of money.

Studies Show Little Benefit in Supplements

Foremost is the lack of accountability placed on supplement manufacturers. are unregulated. The burden is on the government to prove they are harmful, for them to be removed from the marketplace (remember fen-fen?) Supplement makers aren’t supposed to make health claims that aren’t substantiated, yet it is done all the time. By the time regulators catch up with them, they have made their profits.

Secondly, nutrition specialists know that nutrients are best absorbed from food. For the most part, an excess of water-soluble vitamins (B1 or thiamin, B2 or riboflavin, B3 or Niacin, B6 or pyridoxine, B12 or cobalamin, Biotin, Folic acid or folate, pantothenic acid, C) won’t hurt you but will be a waste of money as anything your body doesn’t need is excreted in the urine. Fat-soluble vitamins (A, D E, K) can build up in body fat and become toxic. an exception is vitamin D, especially when you are deficient.

These links are useful for explaining what these nutrients can do for you and where they occur naturally in food.

Water soluble: http://extension.colostate.edu/topic-areas/nutrition-food-safety-health/water-soluble-vitamins-b-complex-and-vitamin-c-9-312/

Fat soluble: http://extension.colostate.edu/topic-areas/nutrition-food-safety-health/fat-soluble-vitamins-a-d-e-and-k-9-315

Whole foods also provide micronutrients, antioxidants, fiber, etc., all necessary for healthy bodies as well.

Bottom line: “Food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food” and don’t get suckered into taking many supplements you don’t need. With all this said, if you have unique medical issues, always consult with your doctor. This is generic advice for the mostly healthy.

 

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